5 Marketing Lessons Learned from marketing Find New Customers


Marketing the new Florida-based company Find New Customers has been an interesting experience and I’ve learned a lot that i wish to share with you. By the way, I came up with this campaign as I was badly hurt and in the hospital.

As a top lead generation company, we should be able to do this well, so try these in your business and a let me know how you do with them.

These five lessons work for any smaller business as well as larger businesses, so learn them and embrace them.

1. Stop SellingStop Selling

No one likes to be sold, but nearly everyone likes to buy. You need sales but you must first earn trust. So you need to share thought leadership content with prospective buyers and not blatant sales pitches. In fact, one of our mottos is “Always be Helping.” I once got a sales pitch email and I immediately deleted it.

2. When the World Zigs, You Zag

Face it. Everyone sends emails today and almost no company uses old fashion snail mail. But that’s exactly why you should use it.  People get far too many emails and their mailbox is empty..

3. You Must Use the Phone

Using the phone you talk to people, leave messages and uncover interesting facts to clean up your database. There is no other way to get that useful information. Call each and every week to your marketing database.  It also really helps to do some research, like visiting their website before you call..  I also wrote a nice script to use on the phone and it works very well. Planning is key.

4. Mix Your Media

Don’t just keep emailing someone or just calling them.  Use mail, email, calls, everything you can think of to earn trust with prospective buyers.  Even connect with people on LinkedIn, but take the time to personalize your LinkedIn invitations.

5. Marketing is an Ongoing Process - It Never Stops

If you just market for a couple of months, you may just get one or two leads - or zero.  Marketing takes an ongoing investment of time, effort and money and every business needs to do it all the time..

If your company is looking for help from a very well-connected award winning BtoB marketing expert, just fill out the form below.

What do you think? Love comments here.

This blog is written by the award-winning marketing expert Jeff Ogden, the Fearless Competitor - President of Find New Customers. You can follow me on Twitter at @fearlesscomp

How to Write a Highly Effective Subject Line


B2B Demand Generation | Crafting Email Subject Lines that Work

By Jill Konrath (We’re honored to share this great article by Jill. We especially like her

Jill Konrath

Jill Konrath

advice to avoid company and product info, use a referral and mention a trigger event. All sage advice. And since the main tool for lead nurturing is email, this post is spot on)

As Jill requested, her info follows the post.

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If you’re like most sellers, you don’t pay a lot of attention to the subject lines. They’re an afterthought. No big deal, right?

Totally wrong. Your subject line is the most important part of your message. If it’s not a good one, your email gets trashed in a nanosecond. In fact, research by ExactTarget (my email newsletter service) show that the average person spends only 2.7 seconds on a message before deciding if they’ll delete it, forward it or read it.

Just 2.7 seconds. That’s all the time you have to capture a readers attention. That’s why your subject line is so darn critical.

First, let’s talk about what you don’t put in a subject line. In order to avoid auto-deletes, it’s imperative for you to:

  • Avoid salesy verbiage. Get rid of words like excited, hot new product, free offer or special pricing.
  • Avoid info on your company. No one is interested in your new product announcements or company updates except you. Want to see how not to do this? Check out A Terrible Prospecting Email.
  • Avoid capital letters. Just the first word should be capped. Otherwise it seems like a headline, not a personal message.

Now, let’s talk about what works in your prospecting emails. Here are several options that have proven effective with today’s crazy-busy prospects.

  • Use a referral. If someone has referred you to this person, put that in your subject line. They’ll want to know why. For example, you might write: Terry Jones said to get in touch.
  • Ask a quick question. If your prospect feels it’s simple and relevant, they’ll take a look. Your subject line might read: Quick question re: new client acquisition challenges.
  • Tempt with ideas or information. My prospects are always interested in subject lines like this: Idea to reduce your sales cycle time or How XYZ company increased sales to Fortune 500 companies by 127%.
  • Mention a trigger event. If something is happening within the company or in their greater business environment that’s relevant to your offering, bring that up. For example, if you read about a recent merger, you might write: Impact of XYZ merger on (insert relevant business issue you address.)

Get the picture? To work, your subject lines must focus on something your prospect cares about. If you do that, they’ll keep reading.

Here’s a major caveat though. When they start reading your message, it needs to deliver exactly what you promised in your subject line.

If you move into salesy mode or talk about your company, you’ll trigger your prospect’s auto-delete reaction. They can’t control it. And you’ve lost the opportunity to open the conversation.

Hopefully by now you understand just how critical those simple little subject lines are to your sales success. I’d suggest you sit down right now and create 10 new ones you can use in the upcoming weeks.

Finally, start your experiment.
See if you can tell which subject lines are most effective with your prospects. Then create variations off the same theme. You’ll immediately see the difference in your sale success.

Jill Konrath, author of SNAP Selling and Selling to Big Companies, helps sellers get more prospects in their pipeline, speed up sales cycles and land bigger contracts. She’s a frequent speaker at sales conferences. For more fresh sales strategies that work with crazy-busy prospects, visit www.jillkonrath.com.

We invite you to check out the Lead Nurturing and Scoring Service offered by Find New Customers.

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Jeff Ogden (@fearlesscomp) is the President of the B2B lead generation consultancy Find New Customers. Find New Customers helps companies dramatically improve revenue results by transforming the way they attract, engage and win new customers. Contact Find New Customers by calling (516) 495-9350 or sending an email to sales at findnewcustomers.com.

“If more companies listened to (Find New Customers) a lot more would be sold.” Dan McDade, Pointclear.

Panel Discussion: B2B Content Marketing for Marketing Automation


B2B Demand Generation | Content Marketing for Marketing Automation

Join me on this webinar at 8am ET tomorrow. The link to sign up is below.

I’m the first to admit I get WAY too many webinar invitations. I ignore 98% of them at least. But when three good friends and people you respect host a webinar, I take notice. I signed up and I hope you will join me.

Why is this important? If you bought marketing automation - e.g. Eloqua, Marketo, Silverpop, Pardot, Act-On, etc. you find it has an insatiable appetite for content. (like the guy in the photo.) Lead nurturing requires a continual flow of compelling (to the recipient) content.

Marketing automation

Marketing automation's ravenous appetite for content

Here are the blue ribbon experts and good friends of Find New Customers. (all based in the UK, by the way)

  • Bob Apollo, Inflexion-Point Strategy Partners
  • John Sweeney, DemandGen
  • Doug Kessler of Velocity Partners and author of B2B Content Marketing Workbook. (A transplanted Yankee in London by the way.)

Sign up for the panel discussion on B2B Content for Marketing Automation.

Read my blog on Kindle

Jeff Ogden (@fearlesscomp) is the President of the B2B lead generation consultancy Find New Customers. Find New Customers helps companies dramatically improve revenue results by transforming the way they attract, engage and win new customers. Contact Find New Customers by calling (516) 495-9350 or sending an email to sales at findnewcustomers.com.

Find New Customers helps companies (with between 150 and 5,000 employees who sell complex products to businesses) to implement world-class lead generation programs. As companies struggle to create quality sales opportunities, they turn to lead generation companies like Find New Customers.

“If more companies listened to (Find New Customers) a lot more would be sold.” Dan McDade, Pointclear.

Panel Discussion: B2B Content Marketing for Marketing Automation


B2B Demand Generation | Content Marketing for Marketing Automation

I’m the first to admit I get WAY too many webinar invitations. I ignore 95% of them at least. But when three good friends and people you respect have a webinar, I take notice. I’m signed up and I hope you will join me.

Why is this important? If you bought marketing automation - e.g. Eloqua, Marketo, Silverpop, Pardot, Act-On, etc. you find it has an insatiable appetite for content. Lead nurturing requires a continual flow of compelling (to the recipient) content.

Marketing automation

Marketing automation's ravenous appetite for content

Here are the blue ribbon experts and good friends of Find New Customers. (all based in the UK, by the way)

  • Bob Apollo, Inflexion-Point Strategy Partners
  • John Sweeney, DemandGen
  • Doug Kessler of Velocity Partners and author of B2B Content Marketing Workbook. (A transplanted Yankee in London by the way.)

Sign up for the panel discussion on B2B Content for Marketing Automation.

Read my blog on Kindle

Jeff Ogden (@fearlesscomp) is the President of the B2B lead generation consultancy Find New Customers. Find New Customers helps companies dramatically improve revenue results by transforming the way they attract, engage and win new customers. Contact Find New Customers by calling (516) 495-9350 or sending an email to sales at findnewcustomers.com.

Find New Customers helps companies (with between 150 and 5,000 employees who sell complex products to businesses) to implement world-class lead generation programs. As companies struggle to create quality sales opportunities, they turn to lead generation companies like Find New Customers.

“If more companies listened to (Find New Customers) a lot more would be sold.” Dan McDade, Pointclear.

What 5 IT buyers would do if they were the CMO at a Technology Company by Kenny Madden & 5 Technology buyers


B2B Demand Generation | What would you do if you were named Chief Marketing Officer?

Find New Customers is pleased to present this guest post by Kenny Madden of Spiceworks.  I really like it because he asks actual buyers what they would do if they were Chief Marketing Officer.The comments here should ring true to all marketers - don’t BS us, build relationships, stop selling, etc.

We’re featuring a lot of great guest bloggers this summer. In addition to Kenny, we featured Joe Pulizzi of Junta42 and Content Marketing World - Developing an Integrated Content Marketing Strategy that Works. More to come.

We hope you enjoy it. We thank Kenny and invite you to check out his profile below the post.

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After spending several years selling both enterprise & SMB infrastructure software I thought I had a good handle on selling and marketing to the tech professional.  However, after spending the last 3 years engaging with a community of1.6 Million IT buyers, I realize I there is still a massive disconnect between IT marketers and IT buyers. Instead of me voicing my opinions (which I’ve learned are irrelevant ) I decided to ask 5 IT technology buyers what they would do if they were the CMO of a IT Vendor.

Question:

If you were CMO of a tech vendor. What would you advise you’re your sales and marketing teams to do more effectively when selling to the technology buyer?

IT Professional #1:

Get beyond cold calling lead generation and do warm lead generation. We as IT decision makers are overwhelmed with people following the old model of get a name, make a call, set a follow up, call back, make a pitch, keep calling sales and marketing. For marketers to follow this model requires a large time investment, you have to run a campaign to get leads, then sort and categorize and finally follow up. The bad part is most of these are cold leads and the sales rate is low. Instead of spending this time churning through business cards and registration lists look for ways to have conversations with potential customers. By simply talking to people informally at events or in online communities, you can see who is interested in what you are doing right now, who are potential prospects, and who are not in need of what you are doing at this time. Show competence, build trust, and engage. Form a true partnership, one where the vendor and partner have a mutually beneficial relationship based on trust and working effectively together, not a pseudo partnership based on being the person they usually buy from.

IT Professional #2:

Be upfront about the technology and pricing. Don’t make me jump through hoops to find out if it will work and how much it will cost.

IT Professional #3:

Help the customer don’t just think about the sale. For me if a vendor helped me go through the process, did things on my terms and did not hassle me  - especially when their product didn’t fit my needs then I would consider them in the future I would not not just think “they were a pain to talk to I’m not going to look at them again”. Also I demo your product and it doesn’t do what I want it to when I first look at it, it’s not going to do it when you hard sell it by saying if you go into this hidden menu and press q l and y with your left hand while on your head it will bring up a new menu which allows you to hack into the applications core and make it do what you want. A product should be simple enough for me to look at and go..

IT Professional #4:

I would actually focus on helping your sales people with their tech skills. Not only educate but have them work some (lab type environments) with the technology they are selling. They don’t need to get into the fine details (that’s what engineers are for) but they should have a solid understanding about what they are selling. I would condemn the use of IT buzz words, usage of these words immediately turn the ears off of the people you are trying to reach.

  • Sales: I would direct them to focus on developing relationships with their clients. Become their business partner. Learn their business, personal & business interests, likes & dislikes, etc. In other words be their friend. This is the only way you can truly offer solid solutions to them. I would have them focus not on sales, but on developing relationships. With a solid business relationship The sales will come.
  • Marketing: Don’t produce Ads that provide little to no information. Ads are created for one purpose, to make the audience unhappy with what they currently have and attract them to what you are selling. But that only works for general public. The ads we need to produce are for professionals. These people are highly technical, professional, business people. The ads need to be adjusted accordingly.

IT Professional #5:

I would advise marketers to spend time on campaigns that keep the company and its solutions in peoples’ minds, not necessarily specific products. As far as sales goes, when someone is inquiring about our product I don’t want them to be pushy but use case studies and examples of why solutions make sense for the customer, especially if the competition includes OSS or free alternatives, as that can be attractive to IT people in order to keep costs down. Fortunately or unfortunately cost is often a major concern with small businesses and their IT projects.

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Some great suggestions from a variety of IT professionals, who on average spend $275,000 per year on IT products and services. Folks that might even be some of your prospects.

Kenny Madden works in market development at Austin based Spiceworks, the fastest growing IT social business network. Kenny has spent his career helping accelerate sales of technology products at high growth companies including CA Technologies, Motive and AlterPoint. He can be reached at kenny@spiceworks.com.

We also invite you to purchase our $49 Demand Generation training program - delivered via email.

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Jeff Ogden (@fearlesscomp) is President of the B2B lead generation consultancy, Find New Customers. He presented “How to Build an Awesome Personal Brand” at the 140 Social Media Conference and appeared to discuss B2B lead generation on Sales Lead Management Radio.

Find New Customers helps companies (with between 150 and 5,000 employees who sell complex products to businesses) to implement world-class lead generation programs. As companies struggle to create quality sales opportunities, they turn to lead generation companies like Find New Customers.

The Problem with Reliance on Junior Marketing Folks


B2B demand generation | The problem with junior marketing members

A typical young lady in marketing

Had an interesting chat with Todd Lebo, Senior Director of Content & Business Development at MECLABS Primary Research. He observed one of the most common mistakes made by B2B companies - a false reliance on junior marketing team members.

That rang true. I’ve observed the lack of marketing leadership affecting a lot of companies. It’s been confirmed by many other marketing experts too.

While these junior members handle day-to-day responsibilities, they lack the leadership and strategic planning skills a marketing department really needs. It adversely affects a company’s ability to attract and win new customers.

An Example of Junior Marketing - a comment shows the problem.

Find New Customers was meeting with a prospective new client. In the meeting, we turned to the young lady responsible for operating one of the finest revenue management software platforms on the market and asked her to define lead nurturing.

She told me “Lead nurturing is sharing information with prospective buyers to convince them to buy your product.”

I bit my lip and said nothing. But in the back of my mind, I was appalled.

That’s NOT an adequate definition of lead nurturing. (If you cannot even define it, you sure can’t implement it.)  Here’s my definition:

“Lead nurturing is the process of sharing highly relevant content with target buyers, regardless of their timing to buy. The goal is to earn their trust and become the preferred provider for their business challenges.”

It is clear this young lady lacks the experience or knowledge to implement lead nurturing and scoring, though she has the operating role with a fine software product. Interestingly, I spoke to their Chief Marketing Officer - he agreed completely. His team, though hard workers, are novices at B2B demand generation.

The Real Problem - A Failure of Leadership

What we have overall is a failure of leadership. Fortunately, this particular company realizes the problem and may hire Find New Customers to provide leadership in lead nurturing and scoring. The CMO told me he’s a fan of outsourcing talent.

I suggest rather than hiring marketing leadership, you should do what this CMOs wishes to do and turn to outside experts such as Mac Macintosh of AcquireB2B, Paul Mosenson of NuSpark Marketing, or Dan McDade of Pointclear. Their expertise can provide the short term leadership your company really needs and provide the guidance your young and experienced marketing staff needs.

The Effects of Junior Marketing Folks Shows in the Data

The problem with junior marketing folks shows in the data too.

As you see from the chart below, companies do a good job on “top of funnel” activities, such as email, direct mail and events. Those function can be handled by junior folks.

But very few do “middle of funnel” activities such as lead nurturing and scoring. Those functions tend to be beyond the abilities of junior marketing folks. For instance, lead nurturing required deep buyer personas, compelling content and story-telling skills - far beyond the pay grade of most “marketing managers.”

Marketing Programs 250 EmployeesWhat do you think? Do you agree that too many companies, especially smaller ones, have too much of a reliance on young, inexperienced marketing workers?

We love your comments (enter below) and we invite you to share on social networks.

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Jeff Ogden (@fearlesscomp) is President of the B2B lead generation consultancy, Find New Customers. Find New Customers helps companies rapidly grow revenue by transforming how they attract, engage and win new customers. Contact Find New Customers by calling (516) 495-9350 or sending an email to sales at findcustomers.com.

Find New Customers helps companies (with between 150 and 5,000 employees who sell complex products to businesses) to implement world-class lead generation programs. As companies struggle to create quality sales opportunities for sales leads, they turn to lead generation companies like Find New Customers.

“Find New Customers can certainly help your business dramatically improve the flow of sales-ready leads to salespeople.” Paul Dunay, Buzz Marketing for Technology.

Advanced Lead Scoring Secrets — Moving from ‘Good’ to ‘Great’ as a B2B Marketer


B2B Lead Generation | Uncovering quality prospects using lead scoring

A great post penned by Adam Needles, formerly Director of Field Marketing at Silverpop. (Editor’s Note: Adam has now moved to LeftBrain Marketing)  Here’s the permalink to the original article too.  Very important information on lead scoring best practices.  Enjoy and thank you, Adam.Bulls eye

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One theme that has been consistent in my conversations with B2B marketers over the past few months is this: Lead scoringis one of the greatest opportunities and challenges when it comes to implementing and tuning their marketing automation processes and systems.

Adam Needles

Adam Needles

Marketers tend to get the basics — especially when it comes to core ideas such as scoring against target demographics and applying ‘BANT’ analysis (i.e., budget, authority, needs and timing). But B2B marketers seem to really stumble in taking their scoring and subsequent routing and nurturing to the next level. In fact, in research Silverpop is releasing this week, my colleagues found that 53% of B2B marketers still don’t score, and 69% don’t nurture (which requires some level of scoring and is a casualty of low scoring rates).

This issue is especially front and center for me, given I’m in the midst of developing my presentation for a lead scoring Webinar.. My presentation will be rooted in the basics, but I’m increasingly of the mindset that such a Webinar also needs to cover the ‘advanced’ issues, too. After all, this seems to be where scoring falls down.

What are these advanced ‘lead scoring secrets’?

So while my Webinar will go into more details — and also ground these ‘advanced’ topics in context and frameworks — I thought I’d present some of the working insights I think can really help B2B marketers take their games to the next level … and find real success with scoring. So here goes:

> Build the concepts of dialogue and momentum into your model: Given an environment in which B2B buyers have more information power than ever, and sales teams are being pulled into the buyer dialogue later and later, a new opportunity has emerged for B2B marketing organizations to be the organizational ‘point person’ on engaging with, managing and providing continuity in the pre-sale dialogue with buyers. The goal is simple — nurturing a lead until it is sales ready — but to do this marketers have to operate like a tenured sales professional, carefully managing the nurturing process in response to the buyer’s signals.

“Industry statistics show that up to 40% of leads may make their first purchase after having been in the ‘remarketing database’ [i.e., nurturing pool] for 18 months or longer,” notes David Taber in a recent Computerworld piece. “This is the whole purpose of marketing automation systems …”

Yet the sales concepts of building a dialogue with a prospect and of understanding when a buyer gains momentum too often are not at the heart of scoring — especially when there is over-reliance on demographic and BANT data. Moreover, behavioral score components should distinguish between activity that is increasing versus activity that is decreasing.

SiriusDecisions explains in a recent research brief that your scoring must understand “… the ‘arc of activity’ that buyers tend to use.” Combinations of activity that build on each other — as a consistent ‘dialogue’ and that demonstrate momentum in propensity to buy — should increase the score. Similarly, lead scores should ‘decay’ after periods of inactivity — demonstrating declining momentum.

> Leverage insights from the communication channel and the nature of the information ‘consumed’ by the prospect to better assess a buyer’s relative maturity: This builds on the previous point and is perhaps one of the most mis-understood of the factors that go into ‘great’ lead scoring. Research into integrated marketing communication programs and buyers’ information search patterns show that different communication channels and types of information are sought at different stages in the buying process. (Note that this pattern will differ by company, product and industry.) Observing this activity can indicate the relative maturity (and momentum) of the buyer in their search process; thus, it should be a key factor in increasing and decreasing a lead’s score.

> Make sure your lead score captures insights from both online AND offline activity: This also builds on the previous point and is another area that B2B marketers fail to fully integrate into their scoring methodology. If your score only takes into account online activity, it is not a complete picture. Make sure that event attendance, inbound calls and other offline behaviors that are integral to the buyer’s process — and that also indicate relative maturity and momentum — are baked into your scoring methodology.

> Expect your scoring model to change: Before you can even build your scoring model, you will have to examine past campaigns and historical data and conduct conversations with both marketing and sales team members. You will need to look for correlations that exist in your core business logic between marketing/sales actions and propensity to buy. You will make initial assumptions about relationships between factors and build initial score models … and yet your model still won’t be right.

“All successful [marketing] processes are ongoing in nature,” explains Steve Gershik in a past post on his blog, The Innovative Marketer. “Tweak your programs, tweak your scores, change the metrics you look at to analyze the scores of your leads. Be open and flexible when you get started and you’ll find you have a program that your whole team, marketing and sales, buy into.”

It is only through constant testing and monitoring that your lead model will mature. But this makes sense. After all, what you are building in the lead score model is the heart of an ongoing set of demand-generation process — a lead factory — that requires care and maintenance. Silverpop’s Lead Management Workbook adds: “A solid lead-scoring approach not only helps you to rank prospects against each other, but can smooth the lead flow and help you build a more powerful and accountable marketing organization based on rigorous analysis and testing, rather than intuition and educated guesswork.”

> Constantly re-assess lead score data: Underlying your changing model is a constantly-changing set of behavioral data from your buyers. Maintaining accurate scores requires constantly re-assessing and updating the data. “Allow scores to be updated with third-party information such as data-appends or data entry by your sales force,” suggests the Lead Management Workbook (cited above). “Automatically add new data as it is gathered over time and re-score leads.”

> Work on tuning the relative ‘elasticity’ of variables in your model:Perhaps the most fundamental ‘integrity’ issue for lead score models — firmly rooted in the disciplines of economics and of linear regression — is the idea of relative elasticities. I.e., different elements of your score will have varying degrees of impact on a prospect’s ‘propensity to buy.’ So make sure your scoring model reflects this.

“The actual score doesn’t matter,” explains Steve Gershik (cited above). “The important thing is that the point value is relative to other activities so in the end, the higher the score, the more actionable the lead is.”

SiriusDecisions discussed this issue in a recent brief, “When Good Lead Scoring Models Go Bad.” In one section of their brief, they call out the importance of tuning elasticity in the overall weighting of variables in a scoring model:

While it may be tempting to take five variables in an overall scoring model and weight them all equally at 20 percent of a prospect’s overall viability, we advise you to resist. Based on your ideal customer profiling (combining this with activity and BANT variables if both are possible/intuitive to include), choose the variables you believe to be most predictive of a prospect’s viability and prioritize your weighting there.

What do you think?

While it is not an exact science, lead scoring is critical to successful nurturing and lead management. This requires that as marketers we get under the covers a bit and address some of these ‘advanced’ issues — which is what I wanted to do here. I hope that these ideas were helpful. What thoughts/ideas would you add to this list?

For companies looking to optimize each marketing campaign in b2b lead generation who wish to improve the way they acquire customers, Find New Customers is the place to go.  CSO Insights says companies need to improve the way they generate leads through great marketing campaigns and implement processes for business to business lead generation.

What do you think? We love comments and people who share.
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Jeff Ogden (@fearlesscomp) is President of the B2B lead generation consultancy, Find New Customers. He presented “How to Build an Awesome Personal Brand” at the 140 Social Media Conference and appeared to discuss B2B lead generation on Sales Lead Management Radio.
To learn more about Jeff, please click on Who is the Fearless Competitor?

Find New Customers helps companies (with between 150 and 5,000 employees who sell complex products to businesses) to implement world-class lead generation programs. As companies struggle to create quality sales opportunities for sales teams, they turn to lead generation companies like Find New Customers.

“Find New Customers, can certainly help your business dramatically improve the flow of sales-ready leads to salespeople.” Paul Dunay, Buzz Marketing for Technology.